Naturalistic intelligence careers


How to Find a Career Path Using the Theory of Multiple Intelligences

By Joe Wilner on January 20, 2017

One of favorite quotations is, Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.

People still maintain the incomplete sentiment that success is coupled with a standardized score or a high IQ career.

This can really limit someone’s perspective for career possibilitiesif they don’trelate to this standard definition of success.

If we broaden our horizon to encompass a wider range of diverse aptitudes, we can find a career where our natural strengths and talents shine.

One way to expand on career possibilities is to use the theory of multiple intelligences.

The term multiple intelligences was coined by developmental psychologist, Dr. Howard Gardner in 1983, as a way to describe peoples natural inclination for learning and engaging in the world.

You may be more intelligent than you think. Read on to find a career that fits your essential intelligence.

This is the human ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) as well as sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations).

Possible jobs include:

  • Astronomer
  • Botanist
  • Conservationist
  • Gardener
  • Farmer
  • Animal Trainer
  • Zookeeper
  • Geologist
  • Marine Biologist
  • Ecologist
  • Veterinarian
  • Forest ranger
  • Landscaper
  • Meteorologist
  • Nature photographer

Musical intelligence is the capacity to discern pitch, rhythm, timbre, and tone. This intelligence enables us to recognize, create, reproduce, and reflect on music, as demonstrated by composers, conductors, musicians, vocalist, and sensitive listeners. Lets rock and roll!

Possible jobs include:

  • Audiologist
  • Choir director
  • Music conductor
  • Music critic
  • Music publisher
  • Musicpromoter
  • Music retailer
  • Music teacher
  • Music therapist
  • Piano tuner
  • Recording engineer
  • Songwriter
  • Sound editor
  • Speech pathologist

Have you always been drawn to arithmetic problems, strategy games and experiments? Logical-mathematical intelligence is the ability to calculate, quantify, consider propositions and hypotheses, and carry out complete mathematical operations. This fits the traditional view of intelligence and encompasses the stereotypical prestigious career.

Possible jobs include:

  • Accountant
  • Computer analyst
  • Computer technician
  • Computer programmer
  • Database designer
  • Economist
  • Engineer
  • Lawyer
  • Mathematician
  • Network analyst
  • Pharmacist
  • Physician
  • Physicist
  • Researcher
  • Statistician

A spiritual intelligence was not included in Gardners original work but is now viewed as a viable aptitude that can be quantified and studied. This intelligence can be recognized by a sensitivity and capacity to tackle deep questions about human existence, such as the meaning of life, why do we die, and how did we get here.

Possible jobs include:

  • Pastor
  • Meditation instructor
  • Yoga instructor
  • Psychic
  • Pastoral counselor
  • Chaplain
  • Public speaker
  • Philosopher

Daniel Golemans work on social intelligence has made a huge impact on helping people grow their ability to understand and interact effectively with others. Social intelligence involves effective verbal and nonverbal communication, the ability to note distinctions among others, and sensitivity to the moods and temperaments of others.

Possible jobs include:

  • Diplomat
  • Leader
  • Manager
  • Politician
  • Clergy
  • Social Worker
  • Receptionist
  • Sales Representative
  • Counselor
  • Child Care
  • Coach

Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence is the capacity to manipulate objects and use a variety of physical skills. When a football player makes a diving catch or a dancer effortlessly performs a pirouette theres definitely intelligence at work. They may not be able to quantify the physics of what theyre doing but there is a body-mind coordination that supersedes articulating verbal or mathematical reasoning.

Possible jobs include:

  • Athlete
  • Dancer
  • Mechanic
  • Actor / Actress
  • Performer
  • Physical Education Instructor
  • Craftsman
  • Physical Therapist
  • Farmer
  • Carpenter
  • Builder
  • Park Ranger
  • Firefighter
  • Paramedic

Linguistic intelligence is the ability to think in words and to use language to express and appreciate complex meanings. We see linguistic intelligence at work when the orator makes a moving speech or the wordsmith inspires us through their verbal prowess.

Possible jobs include:

  • Editor
  • Public Speaker
  • Politician
  • Preacher
  • Historian
  • Journalist
  • Teacher
  • Journalist
  • Poet
  • Broadcaster
  • English / Writing Tutor
  • Actor / Actress

Intrapersonal intelligence is the capacity to understand oneself and ones thoughts and feelings, and to use such knowledge in planning and directing ones life. Self-awareness is important for everyone but some people have a natural connection to emotions and the inner-experience.

Possible jobs include:

  • Psychologist
  • Philosopher
  • Writer
  • Theologian
  • Career counselor
  • Consultant
  • Criminologist
  • Energy healer
  • Personal counselor
  • Philosopher
  • Program planner

Spatial intelligence is the ability to think in three dimensions. Core capacities include mental imagery, spatial reasoning, image manipulation, graphic and artistic skills, and an active imagination. I have a friend whos an architect and enjoys the hobby of urban sketching. You can tell he has a precise eye for visual dimension and structure.

Possible jobs include:

  • Artist
  • Architect
  • Graphic Designer
  • Engineer
  • Fashion Designer
  • Interior Decorator
  • Photographer
  • Pilot
  • Sculptor
  • Strategic planner
  • Surveyor
  • Truck driver
  • Urban planner

Youll probably find proficiency in several of these categories, so a helpful exercise is to select your top three areas of aptitude and create a Venn-diagram. From here you can explore careers that overlap between your different capacities.

Have fun and good luck!

Photo credit:Boris SV

How to Find a Career Path Using the Theory of Multiple Intelligences

By Joe Wilner on January 20, 2017

One of favorite quotations is, Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.

People still maintain the incomplete sentiment that success is coupled with a standardized score or a high IQ career.

This can really limit someone’s perspective for career possibilitiesif they don’trelate to this standard definition of success.

If we broaden our horizon to encompass a wider range of diverse aptitudes, we can find a career where our natural strengths and talents shine.

One way to expand on career possibilities is to use the theory of multiple intelligences.

The term multiple intelligences was coined by developmental psychologist, Dr. Howard Gardner in 1983, as a way to describe peoples natural inclination for learning and engaging in the world.

You may be more intelligent than you think. Read on to find a career that fits your essential intelligence.

This is the human ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) as well as sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations).

Possible jobs include:

  • Astronomer
  • Botanist
  • Conservationist
  • Gardener
  • Farmer
  • Animal Trainer
  • Zookeeper
  • Geologist
  • Marine Biologist
  • Ecologist
  • Veterinarian
  • Forest ranger
  • Landscaper
  • Meteorologist
  • Nature photographer

Musical intelligence is the capacity to discern pitch, rhythm, timbre, and tone. This intelligence enables us to recognize, create, reproduce, and reflect on music, as demonstrated by composers, conductors, musicians, vocalist, and sensitive listeners. Lets rock and roll!

Possible jobs include:

  • Audiologist
  • Choir director
  • Music conductor
  • Music critic
  • Music publisher
  • Musicpromoter
  • Music retailer
  • Music teacher
  • Music therapist
  • Piano tuner
  • Recording engineer
  • Songwriter
  • Sound editor
  • Speech pathologist

Have you always been drawn to arithmetic problems, strategy games and experiments? Logical-mathematical intelligence is the ability to calculate, quantify, consider propositions and hypotheses, and carry out complete mathematical operations. This fits the traditional view of intelligence and encompasses the stereotypical prestigious career.

Possible jobs include:

  • Accountant
  • Computer analyst
  • Computer technician
  • Computer programmer
  • Database designer
  • Economist
  • Engineer
  • Lawyer
  • Mathematician
  • Network analyst
  • Pharmacist
  • Physician
  • Physicist
  • Researcher
  • Statistician

A spiritual intelligence was not included in Gardners original work but is now viewed as a viable aptitude that can be quantified and studied. This intelligence can be recognized by a sensitivity and capacity to tackle deep questions about human existence, such as the meaning of life, why do we die, and how did we get here.

Possible jobs include:

  • Pastor
  • Meditation instructor
  • Yoga instructor
  • Psychic
  • Pastoral counselor
  • Chaplain
  • Public speaker
  • Philosopher

Daniel Golemans work on social intelligence has made a huge impact on helping people grow their ability to understand and interact effectively with others. Social intelligence involves effective verbal and nonverbal communication, the ability to note distinctions among others, and sensitivity to the moods and temperaments of others.

Possible jobs include:

  • Diplomat
  • Leader
  • Manager
  • Politician
  • Clergy
  • Social Worker
  • Receptionist
  • Sales Representative
  • Counselor
  • Child Care
  • Coach

Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence is the capacity to manipulate objects and use a variety of physical skills. When a football player makes a diving catch or a dancer effortlessly performs a pirouette theres definitely intelligence at work. They may not be able to quantify the physics of what theyre doing but there is a body-mind coordination that supersedes articulating verbal or mathematical reasoning.

Possible jobs include:

  • Athlete
  • Dancer
  • Mechanic
  • Actor / Actress
  • Performer
  • Physical Education Instructor
  • Craftsman
  • Physical Therapist
  • Farmer
  • Carpenter
  • Builder
  • Park Ranger
  • Firefighter
  • Paramedic

Linguistic intelligence is the ability to think in words and to use language to express and appreciate complex meanings. We see linguistic intelligence at work when the orator makes a moving speech or the wordsmith inspires us through their verbal prowess.

Possible jobs include:

  • Editor
  • Public Speaker
  • Politician
  • Preacher
  • Historian
  • Journalist
  • Teacher
  • Journalist
  • Poet
  • Broadcaster
  • English / Writing Tutor
  • Actor / Actress

Intrapersonal intelligence is the capacity to understand oneself and ones thoughts and feelings, and to use such knowledge in planning and directing ones life. Self-awareness is important for everyone but some people have a natural connection to emotions and the inner-experience.

Possible jobs include:

  • Psychologist
  • Philosopher
  • Writer
  • Theologian
  • Career counselor
  • Consultant
  • Criminologist
  • Energy healer
  • Personal counselor
  • Philosopher
  • Program planner

Spatial intelligence is the ability to think in three dimensions. Core capacities include mental imagery, spatial reasoning, image manipulation, graphic and artistic skills, and an active imagination. I have a friend whos an architect and enjoys the hobby of urban sketching. You can tell he has a precise eye for visual dimension and structure.

Possible jobs include:

  • Artist
  • Architect
  • Graphic Designer
  • Engineer
  • Fashion Designer
  • Interior Decorator
  • Photographer
  • Pilot
  • Sculptor
  • Strategic planner
  • Surveyor
  • Truck driver
  • Urban planner

Youll probably find proficiency in several of these categories, so a helpful exercise is to select your top three areas of aptitude and create a Venn-diagram. From here you can explore careers that overlap between your different capacities.

Have fun and good luck!

Photo credit:Boris SV

Nine types of intelligence: know yours

1. Visual-spatial intelligence

Not everyone can create 3D models in their head by solving a geometric problem or drawing a three-dimensional image. This ability is typical for people with visual-spatial intelligence.

Strengths: creation of visual and spatial images, easy handling of them.

Human characteristics:

  • likes to read, write, draw;
  • solves puzzles quickly;
  • interprets pictures, graphs and diagrams well;
  • memorizes maps and navigates the terrain.

Potential career:

  • architect;
  • artist;
  • engineer.

2. Linguistic-verbal intelligence

This kind of intelligence refers to a person's ability to use words effectively to express what he means.

Strengths: effective work with information, rapid learning of languages ​​and writing.

Human characteristics:

  • remembers written and oral information well;
  • likes to read and can write good text;
  • makes persuasive speeches;
  • can explain well;
  • often uses humor when telling stories.

Potential career:

  • writer or journalist;
  • lawyer;
  • teacher.

3. Logical-mathematical intelligence

Usually, the most obvious indicators used in determining intelligence are logical and mathematical abilities. In Gardner's concept, this is one of the types of intelligence.

Strengths: ability to recognize patterns and analyze information, conceptual thinking and quick math problem solving.

Personal characteristics:

  • excellent problem-solving skills;
  • thinks abstractly;
  • likes to do scientific experiments;
  • solves complex calculations well.

Potential career:

  • scientist;
  • mathematician;
  • programmer;
  • engineer;
  • accountant.

4. Body-kinesthetic intelligence

High coordination of consciousness and body is inherent in people with bodily-kinesthetic intelligence.

Strengths: high motor activity, precise coordination, dexterity, tactile memory.

Characteristics of a person:

  • dances well and loves sports;
  • likes to make things with her own hands;
  • excellent physical coordination;
  • physical endurance.

Potential career:

  • dancer;
  • builder;
  • sculptor;
  • actor.

5. Musical intelligence

If a person has the talent to disassemble musical compositions into elements and track all the instruments that sound in it, then he is the owner of musical intelligence.

Strengths: sense of rhythm, ear and musical talent.

Human characteristics:

  • likes to sing and play musical instruments;
  • easily guesses musical compositions;
  • memorizes songs and melodies well;
  • understands musical structure, rhythm and notes.

Potential career:

  • musician;
  • composer;
  • singer;
  • music teacher.

6. Interpersonal Intelligence

Emotions are closely related to your intellect. Interpersonal intelligence refers to the ability to sense the feelings of other people as well as understand the motives behind their behavior.

Strengths: empathy and interaction with other people.

Characteristics of a person:

  • knows how to evaluate the emotions, motives, desires and intentions of others;
  • communicates well;
  • is skilled in non-verbal communication;
  • sees situations from different points of view;
  • creates positive relationships with others;
  • is able to resolve conflicts.

Potential career:

  • psychologist;
  • consultant;
  • coach;
  • salesman;
  • policy

7. Intrapersonal intelligence

Self-awareness is also a form of intelligence. If a person understands himself, his desires, knows what he feels and why he feels it, then we can say with confidence that he has intrapersonal intelligence.

Strengths: introspection and self-reflection.

Characteristics of a person:

  • understands his strengths and weaknesses well;
  • likes to analyze theories and ideas;
  • excellent self-awareness;
  • clearly defines his emotional state.

Potential career:

  • philosopher;
  • writer;
  • scientist.

8. Naturalistic intelligence

The ability to “read” and understand nature and all living beings inhabiting it is the main characteristic of naturalistic intelligence.

Strengths: ability to study the environment.

Human characteristics:

  • interested in subjects such as botany, biology and zoology;
  • categorizes information well;
  • can enjoy camping, gardening, hiking and outdoor activities;
  • does not like to study unfamiliar topics that are not related to nature.

Potential career:

  • biologist;
  • environmentalist;
  • gardener;
  • farmer.

9. Existential intelligence

“Why and why do we live?”, “what happens to us after death?” are typical questions for a person with existential intelligence.
Strengths: deep sensitivity and high ability to solve fundamental questions, combined with a passion for finding answers to these questions.

Characteristics of a person:

  • looking for answers to questions about the meaning of life;
  • prone to constant reasoning;
  • likes discussions and arguments;
  • explores other people's concepts and ideas.

Potential career:

  • psychoanalyst;
  • religious leader;
  • artist;
  • artist.

Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences

Have you ever wondered why children in the same class learn the program so differently? Or why, after graduating from the same language school, the guys choose completely different professions? Of course, you say, everyone has different abilities. And you will be right. But the point is not in the level of IQ, but in the direction of thinking and perception of the world.

In 1983, the American psychologist Howard Gardner developed the theory of multiple intelligences. Based on his observations, Gardner came to the conclusion that instead of a single intellect, a person has several different intellectual abilities. He writes about this in his book, widely known throughout the world, “The Structure of the Mind. The theory of multiple intelligences. There is also another translation of the title: “Boundaries of the Mind. The theory of multiple intelligences. 9Ol000 Intrapersonal intelligence

  • Naturalistic intelligence
  • Existential intelligence
  • How to apply the theory to an individual child
  • Conclusions based on Howard Gardner's theory
  • The essence of Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences

    one who cannot cope with these tasks. He just has a different way of thinking. He may know all about insects or play three musical instruments.

    Gardner emphasizes that the intellect is not an object or some mechanism in our head. This is a resource that allows you to use different forms of thinking. Intelligence is the ability to solve problems or create products, due to the cultural and social environment.

    The seven types of intelligence identified by the psychologist are equivalent to each other. They do not depend on each other, but work as independent systems. Each species is a way of interacting with the world, and valuing some intelligences more than others is purely a cultural tradition.
    Multiple intelligence, according to its discoverer, has the following types:

    • linguistic;
    • logico-mathematical;
    • musical;
    • spatial-visual;
    • bodily-kinesthetic;
    • interpersonal;
    • intrapersonal.

    Later, while continuing to work on his theory, the scientist added two more:

    • naturalistic;
    • existential.

    So we see 9types of thinking. Let's take a look at each of them.

    Linguistic or verbal-linguistic intelligence

    This is the ability to use speech in its various manifestations, orally and in writing. People who are characterized by this type are excellent speakers. They know how to talk interestingly about everything, holding the attention of the public. It is easy for them to memorize texts, write essays.

    Toddlers with this type of thinking learn poetry easily and recite them with pleasure. The alphabet is easy for them. They start reading and writing early, love books. Such children quickly learn foreign languages, love word games. They like to participate in performances.

    People with this type of intellect become writers, politicians, journalists, editors, translators. They are also suitable for the professions of teachers of literature, coaches, TV presenters, lawyers.

    Logical and mathematical intelligence

    This is a manifestation of logical and abstract thinking, the ability to compare objects mentally, not having them in sight. These are lovers of mathematical precision and calculations, the method of deduction and analysis, finding causal relationships.

    Children with a logical-mathematical type quickly learn to classify, understand abstract concepts and draw conclusions and conclusions. They like logic puzzles, puzzles, games with numbers and all sorts of calculations. They love scientific experiments and books with a bias in science.

    The choice of future profession is also usually associated with science. Such people become mathematicians, physicists, astronomers, engineers, accountants, programmers.

    Musical Intelligence

    This is the ability to play various musical instruments, to sing, to understand the rhythmic pattern, strength and height of sounds. People with musical intelligence are well versed in music. They have excellent hearing, which allows them to distinguish the purity, height, and timbre of sound. They convey and feel the rhythm well.

    Babies with this type already from the first months of life listen to music, react to it emotionally. They prefer musical toys to others. As they get older, they easily memorize and reproduce music. They can start studying at a music school earlier than their peers. In teaching, it is better for them to use listening and listening methods. Lessons are easier for them to do with music.

    These are future composers, musicians, singers, artists, DJs, sound engineers.

    Spatial or spatial-visual intelligence

    It speaks of the ability to modify information, transform it into visual images. The ability to mentally act with these images in three dimensions.

    Adults have a great sense of color and shape, lines and sizes. They have excellent visual memory. They easily remember faces, objects, pictures, and even pages of text. They easily find their way on the map, remember what, how and where it is located.

    Children with dominant spatial thinking easily imagine any images and transfer them to their own world: fantasies, games, crafts, drawings.

    These are sculptors, painters, designers, photographers, architects, builders. This type of intelligence is inherent in chess players and engineers, stylists and image makers, as well as drivers.

    Body-kinesthetic intelligence

    This is the ability to use all parts of the body to perform tasks. This includes the control of gross and fine motor skills, body movements, agility, balance, coordination in space. As well as the use of environmental objects.

    People of this type move a lot, go in for sports and dance. Most often they have an athletic figure. They watch their body, with the help of which they try to assert themselves.

    Children are very flexible, dexterous and active from an early age. They can control and coordinate their movements well. For example, they start riding a two-wheeled bicycle earlier than their peers. They love outdoor games, running around, they cannot sit still for a long time.
    Usually athletes, dancers, jugglers, surgeons, firefighters have this type of intelligence.

    Interpersonal intelligence

    The ability to recognize the feelings of people, capture their mood, understand the language of their behavior and mood.
    These are people who quickly converge with others, feel their state, support them. They have a high empathy for others, understand how they can help. They are kind and attentive to loved ones, and their emotions are well controlled.

    Small children with this way of thinking immediately react to a change in the face, tone of voice, gestures of a significant adult. They try to smooth out conflicts, love playing with other children, and often take on the role of leader. Even in childhood, such guys perfectly understand other people, they try to help, guide, support, and reassure.

    They grow into excellent sensitive leaders, public figures, teachers, doctors, psychologists, volunteers, rescuers.

    Intrapersonal intelligence

    This is also the ability to recognize feelings, but not other people's, but your own. This is necessary to determine self-consciousness, self-development, perception of oneself in the world and with other people.

    Most often they are introverts who strive to develop themselves, make life orderly, follow the rules. They are able to negotiate with themselves in order to change their attitude to some situations.

    Such children are very organized from an early age. They can evaluate their actions, deeds, see their strengths and weaknesses. They understand what they really want. Thanks to this, they are able to decide whether they will do it or not.

    Like people with an interpersonal type, these people choose similar professions. Psychologist, teacher, philosopher, historian and others where the qualities of this intellect are needed.

    Naturalistic intelligence

    The ability of a person to interact with nature, to feel its significance and influence on people and the world around. Such people are interested in studying all living things, as well as observing the weather, collecting stones, and studying changes in the environment.

    Previously, they were those who collected berries, mushrooms, herbs. Now they are mainly ecologists, naturalists, zoologists.

    Children with naturalistic intelligence love outdoor activities. They like to go hiking, go to the mountains. They are happy to help adults in the garden and in the garden. They have been interested in animals and plants since childhood. Gerald Durrell possessed this type of intelligence. You can learn about this from his books, starting with the first "My family and other animals", where he describes himself as a child.

    It used to be customary to take children to lessons in the surrounding world in the nearest parks. Such activities best help children with this type of intelligence learn the program.

    Existential intelligence

    This is the ability to perceive and study the world through religion, philosophy and meditation. Usually this type of intelligence, according to Howard Gardner, have children who are brought up from birth in religious families. But it happens that the child himself begins to be interested in these topics.

    Such children often ask questions about the meaning of life, about death, about God or higher powers. They love history, scripture, spirituality talk. Growing up, they go to study as philosophers, journalists, analysts. They become public figures, yoga teachers, priests.

    So, according to the author of the theory of multiple intelligences, it includes 9 types or directions. It rarely happens that a person possesses only one of them. As a rule, people have several abilities that manifest themselves already in childhood. More precisely, in each of us, to one degree or another, there are all kinds of intelligence. But, depending on the environment, only some of them develop.

    How to apply the theory to an individual child

    Why is it important to know which types of intelligence predominate in a child? First of all, in order to choose the way of learning that suits him. Yes, in ordinary schools it is almost impossible to organize the educational process based on the individual characteristics of each student. However, parents and teachers should understand how it is easier for the child to absorb the material.

    On the other hand, Gardner believes that the child will develop those abilities that are most often used. So, if a child is fascinated from an early age with counting, reading, word games, then with a high probability we can assume that he will form logical-mathematical intellects along with verbal-linguistic ones.

    But it's easy to say "to captivate a child." Some kids can’t get carried away with books, board games for a long time. They are restless, mobile, they often need to change the type of activity. Attempts to seat them to collect a mosaic or puzzles end in crying. Do not rush to scold such a child. Offer him other activities, such as outdoor games. And already through physical activity, try to add familiarity with letters and counting.

    Conclusions based on the theory of Howard Gardner

    In conclusion, we emphasize that:

    • all types of intelligence are interconnected and can be developed. By developing one ability, we will help develop other abilities related to this one. Usually, children have two or three types of intelligence well developed. Others need a little help to turn on. Some will require serious effort.
    • The type of intelligence indicates not only the ability of a person. It is also a clue as to what style and methods of training are appropriate to develop this ability in the best possible way.
    • Using a way of cognition that is convenient for us, we increase the effectiveness of learning many times over. By selecting tasks for the child, taking into account his characteristics, we help him not only to learn new things, but also to learn with joy.
    • Poor grades at school do not indicate a child's low intelligence and learning disability. This is primarily an indicator of an unfinished education system.
    • A student with poor grades has equal chances of success with excellent students in the future if he develops his type of intellect.
    • IQ tests cannot reliably assess a person's intelligence and ability.

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