Smoking for depression


The Association of Cigarette Smoking With Depression and Anxiety: A Systematic Review

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Depression and Smoking | Smokefree

Smokers are more likely to have depression than non-smokers. Recognize the signs of these conditions and understand how smoking can make them worse.

What is depression?

Depression can happen to anyone, but smokers and women are more likely to experience depression. Your race, where you live, or how much money you make doesn’t change your chance of having depression.

Everyone is different, but some common things can lead to depression:

  • Feeling lots of stress.
  • Going through a difficult life event.
  • A big life change, even if it was planned.
  • A medical problem.
  • Taking a medication known to cause depression.
  • Using alcohol or drugs.
  • Having blood relatives who have had depression.

For some people, depression is only a problem during stressful times, like a divorce or the death of a loved one. For other people, depression happens on and off throughout their lives.

Signs of Depression

Everyone has down days and times when they feel sad. Sadness could turn into depression, but depression and sadness are different:

  • How long: Depression is felt every day or most days and lasts at least two weeks, usually much longer.
  • How bad: Depression gets in the way of everyday life. It can stop you from working, carrying out family duties, or doing things you want to do.

People with depression usually feel down or blue. They may have other signs:

  • Feeling sad all the time.
  • Not wanting to do things that used to be fun for them.
  • Being grumpy, easily frustrated, or restless.
  • Have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, waking up too early, or sleeping too much.
  • Eating more or less than they used to.
  • Having trouble thinking.
  • Feeling tired, even after sleeping well.
  • Feeling worthless.
  • Thinking about dying or hurting themselves.

Take the depression quiz to find out if you’re having signs of depression.

How are smoking and depression linked?

Smokers are more likely to have depression than non-smokers. Nobody knows for sure why this is. 

Mood changes are common after quitting smoking. Some people feel increased sadness and you might be irritable, restless, or feel down or blue. Changes in mood from quitting smoking may be part of withdrawal, which is your body getting used to not having nicotine. Mood changes from nicotine withdrawal usually get better in a week or two. If mood changes do not get better in a couple of weeks, you should talk to your doctor. Something else, like depression, could be the reason.

Smoking may seem to help you with depression. You might feel better in the moment. But there are many problems with using cigarettes to cope with depression.

Get Help for Depression

Many people benefit from treatment for depression. Treatment can help reduce symptoms of depression and shorten how long depression lasts. Treatment usually means getting counseling, taking medications, or doing both.

Counseling

Counseling, also known as talk therapy or psychotherapy, can be helpful and is often an important part of treatment for depression. Most talk therapy for depression lasts for only a short time. It typically focuses on the thoughts, feelings, and issues happening in your life now. Talk therapy is more than telling the counselor about your problems. It means working with the counselor to improve the way you cope with things in your life, change behaviors that are causing problems, and find solutions. 

Medications

Many people with depression find that taking medication can improve their mood and ability to cope. Medications for depression are called antidepressants. Antidepressants cannot solve your problems but they can help you even out your mood and better enable you to handle events in your life that are affecting your mood. You will need to see a healthcare provider to get a prescription for an antidepressant. Follow instructions carefully when using antidepressants. Don’t stop taking them without talking to your healthcare provider.

Find Help 24/7

If you or someone you know is in distress or having suicidal thoughts, get help now. Call or text 988 or chat online for 24-hour, free and confidential support from trained counselors.

Para obtener asistencia en español durante las 24 horas, llame al 988.

Scientists have found out how smoking and depression are related

Smoking can lead to depression, Israeli scientists believe. Smokers are much more likely to experience depressive symptoms, and quitting the habit improves mental health.

Smoking is not only harmful to physical health, but is also associated with mental disorders, researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem found. The study was published in the journal PLOS ONE .

Smoking, including passive smoking, is one of the main risk factors for morbidity and mortality worldwide, the authors note. Almost 90% of smokers acquire this habit before adulthood, 98% before the age of 26.

Previous studies have shown that people with depression and other mental disorders are more likely to start smoking than mentally healthy people. In particular, many studies have noted that smokers have a much lower quality of life and more pronounced symptoms of anxiety and depression.

More recent data have shown that there may be an inverse relationship - smoking becomes a predisposing factor for mental problems, and quitting it is associated with a decrease in depressive symptoms.

Together with colleagues from Serbia, the authors of the work interviewed more than 2,000 students of Serbian universities.

As it turned out, smoking students were several times more likely to suffer from depression than their non-smoking peers.

In particular, at the University of Pristina, depression was observed in 14% of smoking students and only 4% of non-smokers, and in the University of Belgrade - in 19% smokers and 11% non-smokers. Women were more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms.

In addition, regardless of economic or social status, students who smoke were also more likely to complain of depression and had lower mental health scores (energy, social functioning) than non-smokers.

"Our study confirms existing evidence that smoking and depression are closely linked," says Prof. Hagai Levin. It's too early to say that smoking causes depression. But tobacco seems to have a negative effect on our mental health.”

The Israeli government is actively cracking down on smoking - as of 2020, cigarettes are banned from being displayed in stores, warning labels on packs are increased to 65% of the pack size, and all tobacco products and e-cigarettes must be sold in the same packaging, without logos or display manufacturer's brand.

Levin would like such measures to take into account the impact of smoking on mental health.

“I encourage universities to advocate for the health of their students by creating cigarette-free campuses where not only is smoking banned, but tobacco advertising is banned,” he says. “Combined with policies to prevent, screen for and treat mental illness, these steps will go a long way towards combating the harmful effects of smoking on our physical and mental health.”

Researchers suggest that the effect of nicotine on the activity of neurotransmitters.

In addition, other chemicals in cigarette smoke indirectly stimulate the release of dopamine associated with feelings of satisfaction, which ultimately leads to mood swings.

Students generally have more mental health problems than non-graduate peers, the researchers note. This is probably due to the stress caused by the strict academic requirements. The authors of the work suggest that depression can push them to smoke, and then, in turn, only aggravate their condition. The researchers hope that quitting smoking will allow students to improve their mental health, but this remains to be tested.

Previously, British geneticists drew attention to the fact that

smoking can provoke not only depression, but also schizophrenia.

Since the prevalence of smoking among people with depression and schizophrenia is generally higher than among the rest of the population, they decided to find out whether the diseases predispose a person to smoking or vice versa.

After analyzing the genomes of nearly half a million Britons and comparing them with data on their diseases and lifestyle, they found that a genetic predisposition to depression is associated with an increased likelihood that a person will start smoking. However, no such association was found for schizophrenia. At the same time, smokers, even without a genetic predisposition, were more prone to depression and schizophrenia.

Cigarettes and madness. Scientists have discovered a new danger of smoking

https://ria. ru/20200114/1563377754.html

Cigarettes and madness. Scientists have discovered a new danger of smoking

Cigarettes and insanity. Scientists have discovered a new danger of smoking Cigarettes and madness. Scientists have discovered a new danger of smoking

In early January, Israeli researchers found that cigarette lovers are three times more likely to suffer from depression than non-smokers. Earlier to similar conclusions... RIA Novosti, 09.03.2021

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2020-01-14T08: 00

2021-03-09T18: 46

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MOSCOW, January 14 - RIA Novosti, Alfiya Enikeeva. In early January, Israeli researchers found that cigarette drinkers were three times more likely to suffer from depression than non-smokers. Previously, several other scientific teams from different countries came to similar conclusions. In addition to depression, smokers have a higher risk of developing schizophrenia and anxiety. The nicotine contained in tobacco contributes to the development of mental illness, scientists believe. Dangerous habitAccording to British experts, up to a quarter of adults suffer from some form of mental disorder. At the same time, most mentally unstable people are, as a rule, heavy smokers. Scientists at King's College London, after analyzing information about 15,000 cigarette drinkers and 273,000 non-smokers, calculated that 57 percent of study participants with psychosis were already smoking when they had their first attack. Moreover, in people who use tobacco, the disease, as a rule, made itself felt a year earlier. However, a 2015 survey of 6,500 people over the age of 40 showed that almost 20 percent of smokers often become depressed and experience increased anxiety. Israeli scientists have confirmed this. Two thousand students from the universities of Belgrade and Pristina, at their request, filled out questionnaires assessing physical and mental health. It turned out that in smokers, signs of clinical depression occur two to three times more often. So, similar states were recorded in 19percent of young people in Belgrade who use tobacco versus 11 percent of their non-smoking peers. In Pristina, these figures were 14 and 4 percent, respectively. In addition, cigarette lovers were more likely to complain of a breakdown and experience problems in communicating with others. According to the authors of the work, their results prove that smoking harms not only physical but also mental health. However, it is not yet clear which physiological mechanisms are involved in this. How smoking drives you crazy Late last year, British geneticists tried to explain the causal relationship between smoking and mental disorders - in particular, schizophrenia and depression. We analyzed the genomes of half a million people, collected data on their health and lifestyle. Then they identified gene variants that may be responsible for the development of depression and schizophrenia, and DNA regions associated with the duration of smoking and attempts to get rid of a bad habit. It turned out that tobacco users have a 2.27 times higher risk of developing schizophrenia. Smokers are also twice as likely to suffer from chronic depression. As for patients who already have a psychiatric diagnosis, they are much more likely than healthy people to become heavy smokers and can no longer give up cigarettes. The authors of the study suggest that nicotine stimulates the release of neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine in the brain, and a violation of their synthesis in the body may be associated with schizophrenia and depression. This hypothesis is confirmed by scientists at University College London. They found that even non-smokers with high levels of nicotine in their blood (so-called passive smokers) had a 50 percent higher risk of mental disorders. Everyone suffersAccording to the work of Korean researchers, cigarettes not only affect mental health, but also can provoke behavioral disorders in children of smokers in the future. We are talking about ADHD - attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, which affects up to three percent of humanity. It is believed that this disease occurs due to disturbances in the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine. But why this happens is not entirely clear. There are many options - from the stress of the mother during pregnancy to the Internet addiction of the child himself. Scientists at Kenbuk National University studied data on 23.5 thousand children and adolescents under the age of 18 with ADHD. In addition to the actual medical information, the researchers gained access to information about the health and lifestyle of the parents and their socioeconomic status. Children whose parents smoke more than 15 cigarettes a day have been found to be nearly 60 percent more likely to develop attention deficit disorder. Moreover, this does not depend on whether the family smokes at home. In addition, adolescents whose father or mother suffered from depression are at risk.

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Pristina, Israel, South Korea, Great Britain, discoveries - ria science, university college london, health, belgrade (district), depression, smoking, dna, genome, schizophrenia

Science, Pristina, Israel, South Korea, UK, discoveries - RIA Nauka, University College London, Health, Belgrade (district), depression, Smoking, DNA, genome, schizophrenia

MOSCOW, January 14 - RIA Novosti, Alfiya Enikeeva. In early January, Israeli researchers found that cigarette drinkers are three times more likely to suffer from depression than non-smokers. Previously, several other scientific teams from different countries came to similar conclusions. In addition to depression, smokers have a higher risk of developing schizophrenia and anxiety. The nicotine contained in tobacco contributes to the development of mental illness, scientists believe.

Dangerous habit

According to British experts, up to a quarter of adults suffer from some form of mental disorder. At the same time, most mentally unstable people are, as a rule, heavy smokers. Scientists at King's College London, after analyzing information about 15,000 cigarette drinkers and 273,000 non-smokers, calculated that 57 percent of study participants with psychosis were already smoking when they had their first attack. Moreover, in people who use tobacco, the disease, as a rule, made itself felt a year earlier.

However, a 2015 survey of 6,500 people over 40 found that nearly 20 percent of smokers often become depressed and anxious.

Israeli scientists have confirmed this. Two thousand students from the universities of Belgrade and Pristina, at their request, filled out questionnaires assessing physical and mental health. It turned out that in smokers, signs of clinical depression occur two to three times more often. So, similar states were recorded in 19percent of young people in Belgrade who use tobacco versus 11 percent of their non-smoking peers. In Pristina, these figures were 14 and 4 percent, respectively.

In addition, cigarette lovers were more likely to complain of a breakdown and experience problems in communicating with others. According to the authors of the work, their results prove that smoking harms not only physical but also mental health. However, it is not yet clear which physiological mechanisms are involved in this.

February 18, 2019, 15:46Science

Constant smoking makes the world "colorless", scientists found out

How smoking drives you crazy

At the end of last year, British geneticists tried to explain the causal relationship between smoking and mental disorders - in particular, schizophrenia and depression. We analyzed the genomes of half a million people, collected data on their health and lifestyle. Then they identified gene variants that may be responsible for the development of depression and schizophrenia, and DNA regions associated with the duration of smoking and attempts to get rid of a bad habit.

It turned out that tobacco users are 2.27 times more likely to develop schizophrenia. Smokers are also twice as likely to suffer from chronic depression. As for patients who already have a psychiatric diagnosis, they are much more likely than healthy people to become heavy smokers and can no longer give up cigarettes.

October 5, 2018, 04:15 PM

This hypothesis is confirmed by scientists at University College London. They found that even non-smokers with high levels of nicotine in their blood (so-called passive smokers) had a 50 percent higher risk of mental disorders.

Everyone suffers

According to the work of Korean researchers, cigarettes not only affect mental health, but can also provoke behavioral disorders in children of smokers in the future.


Learn more